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21 items found for ‘research’

Lar in Focus: Collaboration

Lar in Focus: An ongoing series of blogposts exploring and demystifying some of the processes undertaken by artists developing works for commissions. COLLABORATION With Vinzenz Stergin and Louise Fazackerley ‘Unwritten’ is a new collaborative sound-based work by Austrian Composer, Vinzenz Stergin, and Wigan based poet, Louise Fazackerley. The piece is a tight-knit audio excursion into an almost 2000-year-old figurine found near Frindsbury, Rochester (UK). The narrative of the work is told ...

Tattoo: British Tattoo Art (finally) Revealed

Tattoo British Tattoo Art Revealed 100 Hands exhibit Alice Snape
The major temporary exhibition, Tattoo: British Tattoo Art Revealed, was installed at The Historic Dockyard Chatham in March. A week before it was due to open, Britain went into COVID-19 lockdown and The Dockyard had to close to the public. The exhibition has been sat in the dark for four months but, this week, The Historic Dockyard Chatham is thrilled to announce the incredible exhibition is now open. On display in the No.1 Smithery gallery until September 2020, this exhibition offers a ground- ...

Q&A with our Exhibitions and Collections Officer

Q&A with our Exhibitions and Collections Officer, Helen Brown Helen has worked at The Historic Dockyard Chatham for nearly 8 years and her most recent title as Exhibitions and Collections Officer, means she assists with the logistics and installations of our temporary exhibitions, predominantly in No.1 Smithery. With our latest exhibition, Tattoo: British Tattoo Art Revealed, almost here, we used the opportunity to catch up with Helen to discuss what she has to do to ensure the exhibition i ...

Celebrating the Fitted Rigging House Completion

On Friday, February 28, The Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust celebrated the completion of its £8.2m Fitted Rigging House Project, unlocking the financial sustainability of the charity on a revenue basis and providing much enhanced facilities for visitors, volunteers and the Trust’s nationally significant collection. Built 1793-1805 the Fitted Rigging House (Grade I listed, Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM), 9,000m2) traditionally provided accommodation for dockyard riggers to make warships’ s ...

‘Tis the season’… to get engaged!

wedding venue hire
Did you know that Christmas is the busiest time to get engaged? With Christmas Eve being the most popular day! Here at The Dockyard, we have met many brides to be! Some of which know what they want – armed with folders and organisers! Some are a little lost on what they feel is special to them and some have all the little touches! Whatever bride to be you are, we have come up with our top tips on what to do after you get engaged….     You’ll be showing your hand off like there ...

Top Ten Collections – Chamber Pot…

Chamber Pot A cream and blue ceramic/porcelain chamber pot, with a blue pattern design floral and lions pattern both rampart and passant. INV354: This is one of our large collection of the Invincible artefacts and can be viewed at our Command of the Oceans galleries. Sanitary arrangements of 18th Century warship appear revolting to the modern mind.  Even though disposal of waste was quite easy at sea for it could simply be discharged over the side, the hygienic aspect contributed much to th ...

Top Ten Collections – Chatham Chest

Chatham Chest This object can be seen upon arrival to The Dockyard – it is displayed just before you purchase tickets to go on site. But do you know why it is so important?… The Chatham Chest was established in 1590 by Sir John Hawkins, Sir Francis Drake and Charles Howard, Earl of Nottingham. This was a response to the many injured seamen left destitute due to injuries sustained during the Anglo-Spanish war of 1585-1604. It was the first contribution based welfare system in Europe. ...

Object of the Month – The Sail & Colour Loft

Object of the Month – The Sail & Colour Loft The flags produced for the Royal Navy in the Sail & Colour Loft in Chatham’s Historic Dockyard were important for identification and communication. The booklet produced by the Chatham Dockyard Historical Society entitled ‘Important Events in the Dockyard’s History’ notes that there was a new sail loft in 1620 and a new sail and colour loft in 1734/5 built by French prisoners of war who lived in hulks on the river. This building ...

Get to Know Anna Braithwaite, Composer-in-Residence

Get to Know Anna Braithwaite, Composer-in-Residence We recently had the chance to catch up with Anna Braithwaite, The Dockyard’s first-ever artist-in-residence. Anna began her residency in April, researching new music and art works inspired by the historic and storied grounds of The Dockyards. A classically trained singer, cabaret artist and composer, Anna’s work is distinctly theatrical in nature, thought-provoking, humourous and unexpected. Much of the inspiration for Anna’s work comes ...

Object of the Month – Queen’s Stairs / Assistant Harbourmaster’s Office

Queen’s Stairs / Assistant Harbourmaster’s Office The Queen’s Stairs, a set of stone steps, where there is a main entrance point to the Dockyard leading from the river in the Age of Sail. At the top of the landing stage steps is an early 19th or 18th century wrought iron arch and lantern holder, next to the Assistant Harbourmaster’s Office. This office was built in 1770 for the Dockyard’s two Master Attendants, who were Principal Officers and were responsible for the ships moored i ...

Object of the Month/Hidden Treasures of the Dockyard

Object of the Month/Hidden Treasures of the Dockyard Chequers Gaming Board What did seamen do in their leisure time on board ship? Did you know that games played in the 18th/19th Century are still being played today! Daily life at sea during the age of sail was filled with much hardship, such as cramped living quarters, disease, poor food, pay and bad weather. These harsh conditions on board ship often created a good sense of comradeship, and sailors enjoyed each other’s company off duty.  ...

Object of the Month – GEORGE III’s COAT OF ARMS

Object of the Month – GEORGE III’s COAT OF ARMS The Main Gate was built in 1720 and provided homes for the Yard Porter and the Boatswain. It was the main entrance to the dockyard for the workforce. The King at the time was George I, and the imposing Main Gate building originally displayed his coat of arms. They survived the reign of his son, George II, and most of the reign of his grandson George III. But in 1810 the king’s mental illness led to the establishment of a regency, and the ...

Object of the Month – HMS Cavalier Battle Honours

Each month, we’ll be sharing stories of some of our favourite objects and places of The Dockyard in “Object of the Month” posts. Thanks to our research volunteers, we are able to bring to you a more in detail look at some of these objects. First up is HMS Cavalier’s Battle Honours… Traditionally Royal Navy ships carry the battle honours of all ships of the same name. Honours roll- over from the earliest ships to carry the name up to the present date. HMS Cavalier i ...

An archaeological find shows another superstitious object at The Dockyard

An archaeological find shows another superstitious object Last year when Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust was renovating The Fitted Rigging House as part of an £8.2m project funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), they came across an archaeological find in a staircase. At first glance, finding some leather shoes wasn’t the greatest of finds they were hoping for. But after some investigation of them, a superstition attached ...

New collection at The Dockyard

One of the visitor’s favourite things to do at The Historic Dockyard Chatham is to visit The Victorian Ropery. Dating to the 18th Century, The Victorian Ropery is the only one of the original four Royal Navy Ropeyards to remain in operation. You can still witness rope being made on the ropewalk today, the same way the Victorians would of, or even take a guided tour to “learn the ropes” and behind the scenes information. The Master Ropemakers at The Dockyard busily make rope every week day ...

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The Historic Dockyard Chatham is now open to visitors.

For your safety, and in line with the latest government guidelines, things will be different from your last visit and there will be a few changes to how you’ll explore our 80-acre site. Please take a moment to read our ‘KNOW BEFORE YOU GO‘ information.

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