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Life in lockdown: a day in the life of a digital engagement officer

20 May 2020

To honour Mental Health Awareness Week and to encourage our staff, volunteers, and organisations we work closely with to pay more attention to the present (aka mindfulness), we’ve asked a few of them to write a journal post and diary a day in lock down. These blogs will provide a snapshot of the everyday lives, experiences and wellbeing of our people.

Vikkie Mulford
Digital Engagement Officer

6:30am: alarm goes off – keeping the structure of getting up as if I was physically going into the office has been helpful. 

Breakfast – always eat breakfast! 

My hair is enjoying lock down as I’ve only been washing it every other day and I haven’t worn make up since 18 March! 

Since lockdown, I have left the house at 8am every morning for a walk around nearby Gillingham Park. It’s a bit like Groundhog Day or the Truman Show, you tend to see the same people at the same time every day, but it’s a pleasant space to exercise at a safe distance from other people. I have been listening out for birds, I haven’t managed to see the elusive woodpeckers yet although I can hear them! 

Back in the office (dining room/Victorian washstand that is now my desk) for 9am.  

To work!  

Over the last 8/9 weeks, I have been busy doing lots of digital collections work and collaborating with others. I have also been taking full advantage of the free webinars and resources available – current count since April is 12, I have another one tomorrow. 

I occasionally get interrupted by things like my grandma ringing me from Manchester to say thank you for the rainbow bunting I posted to her, or by my 8-month-old nephew who wants to show me his bouncing and his new tooth. 

I try to have a break from the computer every half an hour (as instructed by the osteopath) for some stretching, star jumps, running up and down the stairs (although my stairs are quite steep so this is a bit precariousalthough that doesn’t always happen, especially if I get engrossed in something or during webinars – although the beauty of not being seen or heard is that you could jump around and eat snacks whenever you want and no one would know! 

11 am: snack time! 

1pm: lunch (unless I get hungry earlier!) I have been eating lunch outside in my garden or just sitting out there with a cuppa whenever possible, especially this week as the weather is so lovely.  

 As a joint effort between Mark and myself, we have started growing veggies. My mum is very jealous of our Pak Choi, she says it’s beginners luck.  

At the end of the working day, I normally do yoga or aerobics which I can just about do in my front room. I have been missing my ballet and tap – my cellar is too full of stuff to tap in now and I have tried a few online ballet classes, but I struggle to swing even my tiny legs around in my front room. At least now I can go for another walk outside. 

6:30/7pm: Dinner time (have been trying to do some new recipes). Last night we had Potatas Bravas and tonight is Tarka Dhal. 

Evenings: What we’ve been watching: slowly working our way through Mark’s boxsets of 24, currently up to Season 5. As a lighthearted alternative to this we have been watching Friday Night Dinner, IT Crowd, Sewing Bee (well I have). 

What I’ve been reading: Joseph Conard – Selected Short Stories, Diana Athill – Alive, Alive Oh! And Other Things That Matter (Christmas present from Claire – thanks Claire), Olesya Turkina + FUEL – Soviet Space Dogs (one of the most beautifully designed books you will ever set eyes on!) 

Find out more about Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust’s initiatives for Mental Health Awareness.

Related News

 

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